Student Scientific Session

There are plenty surgical techniques for each pathology, there are pros and cons for each one, moreover, there is no perfect surgery, only the best option for each case. As a doctor, one of the most important skills to have is to guide your patients to the right treatment for their needs. In order to do this, you need to show confidence, to bring sensible arguments for your decision and also to present everything as clearly as possible in a short period of time. All of these qualities sound more like the arsenal of a public speaker or a debater than a doctor, but debating ideas and convincing people is the everyday hustle of all medics.

SURGICON is the place where young minds come to discuss ideas, share experiences and form networks.

In the spirit of this belief, we are hosting two Debate Sessions during our congress. Each of them will last one hour and will have a central idea that is going to be debated. The two topics are:

  • 1: Brain aneurysm: Clipping vs. Coiling
  • 2: Gastric bypass vs. Sleeve gastrectomy

The two topics differ in the way they are engaged by the active participants – topic 1 focuses on pros versus cons, while topic 2 presents the opportunity to put face-to-face two different techniques and to compare them.

What happens during a debate session?

There will be a moderator who will host the event and give the participants the right to speak. The moderator is also going to present a background story, an introduction or a short description of what is going to be discussed in order to set the status quo.

There will be 4 active participants per session grouped into 2 teams - each team presenting arguments for a different side. They will take turns presenting their arguments (e.g. pros – cons – pros – cons/ technique A – B – A – B). Each participant has 7 minutes to present their idea/ argument and 3 more minutes to answer questions from the public. In those 3 minutes, there will be a mandatory question from the opposing team, meant as a response to the recently concluded presentation.

At the end, one team will be selected as the winner by the jury and the public.

How do I participate?

In order to join the Debate Sessions, you must find a friend and register on our website as active participants. After you both pay the participation fee, one of you should register an abstract comprised of no more than 600 words, describing the arguments and ideas you are going to present. In the registration form, both teammates must be mentioned by their full-name, e-mail and in the order in which they will be presenting.

Your abstract must contain SEXI ideas:

  • Your Statement should be easy to understand and represent what you are trying to prove;
  • You should offer a short and clear Explanation;
  • Do not forget to give eXamples of medical data that support your idea;
  • Show us how it is Implemented in everyday medical practice;

When and how am I going to be announced if I am selected to present?

All selected abstracts will be announced at the same time for Oral & Poster Presentations and for the Debate Session on our website, on our social media pages and also via the registered email. You will also receive the introductory part that the moderator is going to present in order to have a full perspective of the topic of the session.

If you submit an abstract which is NOT accepted in the Scientific Competition, you may still attend the Congress as a Passive Participant or ask for a refund. If you wish to become a Passive Participant, you can pay a 15 EUR difference for the Regular Fee of the Passive participation pack until the 8th of October 2019. If you have a Premium Package, you will have to pay the 10 EUR difference for the Passive participation pack.

Can I submit another abstract for Oral & Poster Presentations?

Yes, each participant can submit a maximum of two abstracts as it follows:

  • One abstract for Debate Sessions and one for Oral or Poster Presentations;
  • Two abstracts for Debate Sessions – one for each topic;
  • Two abstracts for Oral or Poster Presentation – one for each category;
  • Two abstracts for Oral or Poster Presentations;

How is the winner selected?

The winning team is going to be selected based on 5 criteria: scientific content, time management, linguistic skills, persuasion and public impression – the first four criteria are judged by the jury while the last one is decided by the public vote. All criteria have a maximum of 10 points. The points for public impression will amount for: 10 – 7,5 – 5 – 2,5 and will be awarded to each participant separately, depending on the number of votes in descending order.

The winning team is going to be selected based on the sum of all points of the two teammates from a total of 110 points (a maximum of 50 available points for each active participant and another 10 points for logic of reasoning between the two presentations).

Rules

  • Presentation: all active participants are required to have a PowerPoint presentation (Microsoft Office 2007 or newer versions) to enhance their discourse or to better highlight their data.
  • Duration: each participant has 7 minutes for their speech; if you pass your allocated time with more than 30 seconds, the moderator will stop your presentation.
  • Questions: all questions addressed by an active participant should be related to the medical data and should not be considered by any member of the jury or the moderator a direct attack to another active participant. If so, we reserve the right to penalize you with 5 points for each attack and disqualify you at the 3rd fault.
  • Template: all active participants in the Debate Session are required to use the template given by the SURGICON Scientific Department via e-mail.

Guidelines

  • Remember that in a debate match you are not trying to prove that you are right, you are trying to persuade your audience.
  • Active participants and the audience are free to ask questions shorter than 10 seconds – the moderator can ask you to sit down if you are taking too long.
  • You are free to decide how you are going to envision your presentation together with your team-mate; we recommend that the first speaker presents the stronger argument, while the second is going to present another argument and draw a conclusion from what has been showcased by your team.

Abstract Guidelines

SURGICON is an international congress where the accepted abstract language is English. Being a surgical congress, each scientific paper should be related to the surgical field, and be included in one of the 3 main scientific categories listed below. In order to submit a scientific paper, you should be registered as an active participant, send your abstract prior to the deadline, and wait for the accepted abstracts to be announced. Each abstract can be submitted once per category (Oral, Poster or Debate) and only by one author who will register as an active participant and will be the presenting author. In the case that the registered presenting author will not be able to present during the Congress, one of his co-authors can present the paper. It is not allowed for 2 or more participants to send the same abstract. There is a maximum of 4 co-authors for each paper.

All accepted abstracts will be included in the Abstract Book. Scientific Papers already presented during previous national conferences will not be accepted. Each participant can send a maximum of 2 abstracts as follows:

  • two abstracts for Oral or Poster Presentations;
  • one abstract for each category;
  • one abstract for Oral or Poster Presentations and one for Debate Sessions;
  • two abstracts for Debate Sessions – one for each theme.

Active participants can find themselves in any of the following situations:

  • accepted for only one of the three categories only;
  • accepted for Poster Presentation and for Oral Presentation;
  • accepted for Poster Presentation and Debate Session;
  • accepted for Oral Presentation and Debate Session.

What types of research can you present at SURGICON?

In order to be accepted, scientific papers should be included in one of the 3 main scientific categories:

  • Translational Research, which deals with fundamental sciences and their role in a surgical setting;
  • Clinical Research, which is based on the clinical aspects of surgery;
  • Educational Research, which takes on questions about how to improve the current medical training methods.

Based on these 3 categories, the Oral Presentations Competition will be divided into 3 segments, one for each category, each segment having a separate ranking, while the Poster Presentations Competition will have a general ranking.

In order to help you better understand the medical subjects encompassed in each category, we compiled a list of illustrative subcategories, which are mentioned below with examples that will guide your submission process. These subcategories are, however, in no way used for classifying the scientific papers, nor do they influence the evaluating process and the rankings.

Translational Research

  • Developmental Biology/ Tissue Engineering
  • Experimental Therapeutics
  • Immunology/ Immunotherapy
  • Physiology/ Pathophysiology
  • Precision Medicine/ Biomarkers
  • Preclinical Surgical Innovations
  • Other

Clinical Research

  • Clinical Trials
  • Clinical Surgical Innovations
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Geriatric Surgery and Palliative Care
  • Health Informatics
  • Patient-Centered Outcomes
  • Qualitative Research Methods
  • Other

Education Research

  • Continuing Medical Education
  • Disparities and Access to Care
  • Ethics/ Bioethics
  • Health Policy/ Patient Safety
  • Quality of Care
  • Simulation Education
  • Other

What types of studies can you present?

The following types of presentations are accepted:

  • Original research/ Cohort study/ Clinical study
  • Review/ Meta-analysis
  • Case report

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

It answers a wide variety of questions regarding the body's response to current or potential health problems. The purpose of this qualitative research is to describe, explore and explain the health phenomena studied. In this particular type of presentation, the introduction should explain the reason for performing this study. The Materials & Methods should present how the data about the population involved in the study (human or animal test) was obtained. In the results section, you should include the outcome and the conclusions should emphasize the particularity of this original study.

COHORT STUDY

It involves identifying a group that is already under a particular treatment or subject to certain factors, tracking them over time and then comparing the results with those of a similar group that was not affected by to treatment or exposure during the study.

REVIEW

It focuses on a clinical topic and answers a targeted question. An extensive search in the literature is directed at identifying articles that address the topic concerned. The studies are to be examined, evaluated based on their quality, and the results will be summarized in accordance with the initial hypothesis.

META-ANALYSIS

It is a statistical analysis that mathematically combines the results of multiple valid scientific studies on the same subject and reports their findings with a higher statistical power.

CASE REPORT

It is a descriptive study where the observation of one or more patients allows the discussion of some interesting aspects of pathogenesis, diagnosis or treatment. The objective of the presentation is not to get an immediate certification or to test a hypothesis, but to assert qualities of clinical research and to provide some useful data to colleagues. It should describe a particular case useful for giving ideas for other research studies and should include a short introduction, patient data, symptoms/ problems and diagnosis, treatment plans (components, administration, results/ prognosis) and conclusions.

Abstract Structures

All abstracts must have up to 300 words and adopt one of the following structures:

Case report

  • Introduction: This includes the purpose of the presentation and general data about the patient's pathology: informative data aiming at reminding the notions of embryology, anatomy, physiology
  • Case Presentation: case presentation, differential diagnosis, pathophysiology, treatment/ management and the evolution of the patient
  • Conclusion: The conclusion should emphasize the learning points and particularities of the case
  • Keywords

Original study/ Cohort study/ Clinical study

  • Introduction: The Introduction should present the background to the work that has been carried out and should lead to a clearly stated hypothesis or set of objectives
  • Materials & Methods: In this field, the researcher should specify exactly what was done experimentally and what experimental techniques he used
  • Results: Authors should consider how to present their data. There should be sufficient information for the reader to understand the obtained results, but they must be presented without details
  • Limitations: In this section, you should present the eventual shortcomings of your study and how they can be improved in the future
  • Conclusion: The conclusions have to be based on the facts in evidence and should be limited to minimal speculation about the significance of the work
  • Keywords

Review/ Meta-analysis

  • Introduction: It is a brief presentation of what is known about the subject under discussion, what other articles say about this topic and what is the primary target of the review
  • Materials & Methods: In this field, you should specify information related to your sources, inclusion/ exclusion criteria for patients, distribution in subgroups, the period from the first oldest study to the most recent one, variables taken into account and how the raw data was processed and interpreted
  • Results: Each of the ideas presented in the "Results" section must be consistent with those in "Materials and Methods". The actual real data collected from the articles that are linked to the conclusions are summarized here. Also, this section of the abstract should not contain tables or diagrams
  • Conclusion: The conclusions have to be based on the facts in evidence and should be limited to minimal speculation about the significance of the work
  • Keywords

Poster Presentations

A scientific poster is a large-scale document that can be exhibited and which can synthetically communicate the results of a scientific work. Participants should keep in mind that they have 5 minutes for presenting their posters, so it is recommended to make presentations as synthetic as possible.

Rules

  • Dimension: The standard dimension mandatory for all posters is A0.
  • Presenting time: 5 minutes.
  • Printing: It is the active participants’ duty to print their poster and bring it with them at the check-in.
  • Labeling: Images and graphs have to be clear, with labels explaining each item in the graph. Each image and graph will have a number and title, centered and placed under that figure.
  • Tables: If used they should have a centered title placed either above or below the table.
  • Personal data protection: It is widely accepted that the identity of the patient or the information that allows his/ her identification should not be disclosed. The most frequent ways to avoid disclosure of personal data is to cover the name, address or distinctive characters with a black band or blush effect. For pictures showing the face of the patient, cover the eyes with a black band or use blush effect.

Guidelines

The following guidelines are meant to be considered recommendations from the Scientific Department of SURGICON and by no mean are they compulsory or will hinder your presentation if not followed. We strongly encourage originality and new approaches, but we prefer to give those unexperimented active participants a strong base.

  • Colors: Choose a color scheme with 2-3 colors, and use it consistently. If you use too many colors, the reader will assume you used these colors for a reason. Too many colors can also weaken the message of the illustrations.
  • Font Dimension: The posters must be easy to read from a distance of about two meters. Therefore, all text should be printed in letters at least 1 cm high.
  • Font Style: Sans serif (Arial, Helvetica, Calibri) fonts are generally best suited for this type of visual presentations.
  • Frames: If you decide to use the borders, make sure you leave enough space between the content and the border itself.
  • Highlights: Use the highlight technique with moderation. You have the right to highlight the text using bold or italic, but don’t underline as it reduces readability.

Oral Presentations

The oral presentation should be: clear, concise, coherent (following a logical line of presentation), non-redundant, no contradictory. Each session has a jury, consisting of acknowledged physicians in the specific field.

Rules

  • Presenting time: 7 minutes with 3 minutes of questions and discussions
  • Compatibility: The presentation must be compatible with at least Microsoft PowerPoint 2007.
  • Eligibility: The presentation must be handed over at check-in (accepted types: .ppt & .pptx).
  • Labeling: Images and graphs have to be clear, with labels explaining each item in the graph. Each image and graph will have a number and title, centered and placed under that figure.
  • Tables: If used they should have a centered title placed either above or below the table.
  • Personal data protection: It is widely accepted that the identity of the patient or the information that allows his/ her identification should not be disclosed. The most frequent ways to avoid disclosure of personal data is to cover the name, address or distinctive characters with a black band or blush effect. For pictures showing the face of the patient, cover the eyes with a black band or use blush effect.

Guidelines

The following guidelines are meant to be considered recommendations from the Scientific Department of SURGICON and by no mean are they compulsory or will hinder your presentation if not followed. We strongly encourage originality and new approaches, but we prefer to give those unexperimented active participants a strong base.

  • Animations are attractive, but try to avoid overusing them.
  • Fonts need to be large, so that they can be read from the back of the room. The title of the presentation is usually at least 30 and the body text of the slide is at least 20. Sans serif (Arial, Helvetica, Calibri) fonts are generally best suited for PowerPoint presentations.
  • Bullet points should be kept at a maximum of 3-4/ slide.
  • The color scheme should have an open background and dark text to keep the contrast and make the text easy to read.

Recommended structure

  • Title of the presentation, name of the presenter and coordinators (first slide)
  • Introduction (1-2 slides)
  • Content (1 slide)
  • Intermediate slides (15-20 slides)
  • Conclusions (1-2 slides)
  • Bibliography (1 slide)